2021 Remote Philosophy Summer Courses


    Introduction to Logic (5 credits)

  • PHIL 9

    10-Week

    A first course in symbolic deductive logic. Major topics include (but are not limited to) the study of systems of sentential logic and predicate logic, including formal deduction, semantics, and translation from natural to symbolic languages. General Education Code MF

    Proposed Instructor - Ana Pedroso


  • Introduction to Philosophy (5 credits)

  • PHIL 11

    10-Week

    An introduction to the main areas of philosophy through critical reflection on and analysis of both classical and contemporary texts. Focuses on central and enduring problems in philosophy such as skepticism about the external world, the mind-body problem, and the nature of morality. General Education Code TA

    Course video 

    Proposed Instructor - Mariana Imaz-Sheinbaum


  • Introduction to Ethical Theory (5 credits)

  • PHIL 22

    8-Week

    A consideration of ethical issues and theories focusing on the foundation of moral value and the principles governing character and behavior. Designed to extend and develop the student's abilities in philosophical reasoning about ethics. General Education Code CC

    Proposed Instructor - Tyler Olsson


  • Latin American Philosophy (5 credits)

  • PHIL 80E

    Session 1

    Is there a general school of philosophy endemic to Latin America? Would it have to appeal to quintessential Western philosophical questions regarding knowledge, values, and reality? If not, why not, and would it then still count as philosophy? What difference do ethnic and national diversity, as well as strong political and social inequality, make to the development of philosophical questions and frameworks? Course explores a variety of historically situated Latin American thinkers who investigate ethnic identity, gender, and socio-political inequality and liberation, and historical memory, and who have also made important contributions to mainstream analytical and continental philosophy. Cross Listed Courses LALS 80E

    Proposed Instructor - Mariana Imaz-Sheinbaum


  • Bioethics in the 21st Century: Science, Business, and Society (5 credits)

  • PHIL 80G

    Session 2

    Serves science and non-science majors interested in bioethics. Guest speakers and instructors lead discussions of major ethical questions having arisen from research in genetics, medicine, and industries supported by this knowledge. Crosslisted with BMG 80G. General Education Code PE-T

    Proposed Instructor - Sandra Dreisbach


  • Phenomenology (5 credits)

  • PHIL 108

    Session 1

    Phenomenology is both a sub-field and method of philosophy that studies the structure of human consciousness and meaning-making as lived experienced from the first-person point of view. Phenomenology asks a qualitative question which is sometimes formulated as the question: “what it is like to be X?” X can be a certain thing, way, identity, orientation, and so on.  While the field of phenomenology has been practiced by various cultures and under various titles for centuries, it came into existence, under the heading of phenomenology, in the early 20th century based on the works of philosophers such as Husserl, Heidegger, Simone De Beauvoir, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty and others. This course will begin by introducing the field and practice of phenomenology (including critical phenomenology) generally before then turning to the works of philosophers who have constructed contemporary areas of phenomenology most identifiable as feminist and queer phenomenology. Throughout the second half of the course, we will read phenomenological texts concerning female, queer, and trans lived experiences.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 24PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

    Proposed Instructor - Ghoncheh Azadeh


  • Epistemology (5 credits)

  • PHIL 121

    Session 1

    A sustained look at central problems in epistemology. Topics might include the problem of other minds, the nature of justification and knowledge, skepticism of the external world, the nature and limits of human rationality, the problem of induction. (Formerly Knowledge and Rationality.)

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or BME 80G/PHIL 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

    Proposed Instructor - Kelvin Villegas


  • Metaphysics (5 credits)

  • PHIL 122

    Session 2

    Survey of contemporary analytic metaphysics. Topics may include nominalism, metaphysical realism, and the ontological analysis of concrete particulars, including problems of modality and persistence through time.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or BME 80G/PHIL 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

    Proposed Instructor - Dustin Gray


  • Philosophy of Mind (5 credits)

  • PHIL 133

    Session 2

    Focuses on philosophical questions concerning the nature of mind. Central topics include the relation between mind and matter, and the nature of consciousness. Other topics typically explored include: artificial intelligence; animal consciousness and intelligence; and the relation between thought and language.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or BME 80G/PHIL 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

    Proposed Instructor - Austin Hunter


  • Aesthetics (5 credits)

  • PHIL 152

    Session 2

    Problems about form, meaning, and interpretation in art, as found in major aesthetic theories from the philosophical tradition, and also in a variety of encounters between recent philosophy and the arts.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 9; one from PHIL 11 or PHIL 22 or PHIL 23 or PHIL 24 or PHIL 80E or BME 80G/PHIL 80G or PHIL 80M or PHIL 80S; and PHIL 100A or PHIL 100B or PHIL 100C.

    Proposed Instructor - Alexandra (Alea) Grundler