Anthropology Summer Courses


    Introduction to Biological Anthropology

  • ANTH 1

    Session 1

    Study of evolution illustrated by Pleistocene hominid fossils and variation in living human groups. Behavior and evolution of primates examined as they contribute to the understanding of human evolution. Required for all anthropology majors. (Formerly Introduction to Human Evolution.) (General Education Code(s): SI, IN.)

    Proposed Instructor: Susan Kuzminsky


  • Introduction to Archaeology

  • ANTH 3

    Session 2

    Overview of ways of learning about the human past beyond the scope of written history. Reviews development of archaeology, fundamental methods and theories, and archaeology's contribution to understanding human origins, the emergence of farming, and the origins of complex societies. (General Education Code(s): SI.)

    Proposed Instructor: Cameron Monroe


  • History and Theory of Biological Anthropology

  • ANTH 100

    Session 1

    Prerequisites lifted in summer for all students.

    Provides an historical overview from the 18th century to the present of race, ape-human relationships, and human nature. Emergence of an evolutionary framework and of fossil, genetic, and primate information becomes the basis for reformulating ideas about human biology within anthropology. (Formerly History and Theory of Physical Anthropology.) 

    Proposed Instructor: Jay Reti


  • Human Skeletal Biology

  • ANTH 102A

    Session 1

    Prerequisites lifted in summer for all students.

    Presents basic human osteology allowing students to identify skeletal material by element. Emphasizes the dynamic nature of bone by integrating anatomy with a discussion of bone physiology within the context of the human life cycle.

    Proposed Instructor: Susan Kuzminsky 


  • Forensic Anthropology

  • ANTH 103

    Session 2

    Covers basic analysis of human skeletal remains for the medicolegal profession. Assessment of age, sex, ancestry, and general physical characteristics, trauma, and disease are discussed. Addresses legal responsibilities of the anthropologist.

    Proposed Instructor: Eden Washburn


  • Forensic Anthropology (online)

  • ANTH 103I

    Session 1

    Online only class.  

    Covers basic analysis of human skeletal remains for the medicolegal profession. Assessment of age, sex, ancestry, and general physical characteristics, trauma, and disease are discussed. Addresses legal responsibilities of the anthropologist. 

    Proposed Instructor: Cristina Verdugo

    Note: Pending senate approval


  • Human Paleopathology

  • ANTH 105

    Session 2

    Prerequisites lifted in summer for all students.

    Examines paleopathology beginning with ancient hominid populations and proceeding to modern populations. Uses both the skeletal evidence and historical documentation when available. Considers evolutionary, cultural, and biological factors. Topics include: osteological diagnosis of infectious disease; trauma; nutritional deficiencies; dental disease; and developmental defects. 

    Proposed Instructor: Susan Kuzminsky


  • Cultures Of Sustainability And Social Justice (online)

  • ANTH 110I

    Session 1

    Online only class. 

    Brings together diverse forms of cultural knowledge and complexities of everyday life to illuminate longstanding concerns of sustainability and justice. Investigates multiple theories of sustainable development as well as tools, techniques, and contexts for ecological integrity, economic security, empowerment, responsibility and social well-being characteristic of sustainable communities. Case studies are drawn from around the world highlighting the work of Right Livelihood Award Laureates in tandem with UC faculty. (General Education Code(s): PE-E.)

    Proposed Instructor: David Shaw


  • Encounter Studies

  • ANTH 110J

    Session 2

    Through close reading of ethnographic scholarship and some literature, this course will examine how cultures and societies are shaped through encounters: everyday social interactions across difference, colonial conquest, place-making projects, boundaries and intimacies, and capitalist relations. (General Education Code(s): ER) 

    Proposed Instructor: Gillian Bogart


  • Animals, Plants, and Things: Non-Humans in Anthropology

  • ANTH 110M

    Session 1

    Anthropological investigations of the relations between people and non-humans -- animals, plants, and things. Analysis includes the place of animals in mid-century anthropology, Marxist-inspired biography-of things approaches, symbolic approaches, calls to take non-humans seriously, and questioning what lies in “the human.” (General Education Code(s): PE-H) 

    Proposed Instructor: John Nyquist


  • Food Study, Field Study in Perugia, Italy - Faculty-Led Summer Study Abroad

  • ANTH 151 & ANTH 161

    Session 1

    By integrating these two courses – one topical and one methodological – students will receive rigorous training in the key theoretical debates and ethnographic studies in the anthropology of food and hands-on experience by learning and practicing ethnographic research methods. Must apply through UCSC Study Abroad office

    Courses:

    ANTH 151: Workshop in Ethnography - required 
    Through demonstration, practice, and participation, acquire skills in collecting and analyzing cultural data. Work with members of other cultures and with each other to learn to identify significant cultural patterns. Lectures and readings provide added perspective and a theoretical base.

    Proposed Instructor: Rebecca Feinberg

    ANTH 161: Anthropology of Food - required
    Critically examines food as a fundamental aspect of social and cultural life and key concept in the development of anthropological theory and methods. Topics include: power relationships; community building; exchange and reciprocity; symbolism; cultural rules and rituals; globalization; and memory. 

    Proposed Instructor: Melissa Caldwell


  • Lithic Technology

  • ANTH 182A

    Session 1

    Prerequisites lifted in summer for all students.

    Introduction to lithic and ceramic analysis in archaeology. Includes lab analysis, discussions of classification and typology, and exploration of the concept of style as it relates to ceramics and lithics in archaeology. 

    Proposed Instructor: Jay Reti